Over the past year, Steven Diaz has gained a reputation—and a 60K Instagram following—as a real estate rapper. His Reels, which infuse popular rap songs with a real estate twist, have become a viral sensation. Agents from all over the country have hopped on the trend, creating their own Instagram Reels using his audio tracks.

Just a couple of days ago, another agent in the real estate rap scene made a bold move. Shawn Romano, a seasoned Realtor rapper, dropped a diss track set to the instrumental of Tupac’s “Hit Em’ Up,” challenging Steven Diaz to a rap battle. 

Round 1

Shawn Romano: Realtor Diss

In his video titled “Hit Em Up – Realtor Diss,” Romano didn’t hold back, calling out Diaz for his sales production and his overall attitude towards the real estate community. He even went as far as having a friend dress up to mimic Diaz’s signature style – sunglasses, goatee, hoodie, and hat.

Romano captioned his Reel with:

“Nothing personal 💪🏻 this is hip hop. You have to be prepared to defend your position at any moment. That’s what keeps it interesting and keeps everyone on their toes.

“…You can’t expect to sit around uncontested forever. Someone’s always coming for you in this game. That’s the beauty of this art and the reason I cherish it to my core. Only the strong survive, only the hungry eat, and that’s why you must be prepared at all times.”

Steven Diaz: Battle Requirements

Diaz fired back against Romano’s diss track by sharing a Reel where a friend impersonated Shawn, complete with a bandana tied around his head. 

The video took place at a local fair, and “Shawn” approached Diaz, stating he was there for the rap battle. Diaz responded by saying Romano doesn’t meet the requirements for the rap battle. The camera then pans to reveal a “rap battle requirements” sign. The sign listed the conditions for participation, which included:

  • “50K followers
  • “1M views
  • “Live performances
  • “Best video has more views than my lowest”

 He also throws some shade, referring to Romano as “corny” for his Disney song parody.

Diaz captioned his Reel with: 

“When someone comes for the title but don’t meet the requirements!  🤦🏻‍♂️

“Stick to Disney channel and Limp Bizkit and leave “Hip Hop” to the Reaaalltorrr.”

Round 2

Shawn Romano: Back to Back Reels

Unfazed, Romano responded with three back to back Feed posts. The first was a green screen Reel, highlighting the direct messages from people in Diaz’s hometown, Fresno, California. These messages imply that Diaz may have changed as his popularity grew, possibly showing a lack of the humility he had when he was a less-known figure.

Romano’s next post was a Carousel post featuring a screenshot of Diaz’s response and the comment he left on Diaz’s Reel, claiming, 

“I wouldn’t battle me either if I were you. Don’t be mad that you can only do rap. You couldn’t see me on a stage, on a song, in person, or online. So this was definitely your best strategy of being a wuss and backing out but trying to maintain credibility. Your city loves me, and it’s eating.”

Additionally, Romano posted a green screen video showcasing Diaz’s comment section, where he alleges that Diaz paid for likes and comments.

Romano has been active on social media, sharing 31 stories in 24 hours related to this ongoing beef with Diaz. These stories include DMs from other agents criticizing Diaz and ways to stream Romano’s real estate-themed songs.

Will there be a real estate rap battle?

I had the opportunity to speak with both Diaz and Romano about this brewing feud. Diaz expressed that he is not the arrogant type and is actually quite introverted and shy in real life. He appreciates his fans and believes Romano’s move to post his Zillow sales was a low blow. Notably, he’s been gaining more followers as Romano continues to post about their rivalry.

In response to the question of why he initiated this diss track, Romano expressed that it was prompted by his belief that it was time for Diaz to face a challenge and demonstrate that he truly embodies the persona he presents. For Romano, it became a matter of holding someone accountable. Romano feels that Diaz’s followers and supporters have been left neglected, and his primary goal was to represent those individuals and infuse a dose of healthy competition into the real estate rap space, reminiscent of the principles found in the world of hip hop. He suggested that if Diaz ever accepts a face-to-face, on-stage battle, he will unleash a barrage of lyrical warfare. Romano emphasized that he doesn’t harbor ill will toward Diaz and, in fact, expected him to showcase his talents to the world. Regrettably, it appears Diaz has chosen what Romano views as “excuses to avoid loss of credibility if defeated.” 

 In the last 24 hours, this rap battle has ignited a frenzy on social media, with other agents jumping in to share their opinions.

Amidst this rap battle showdown, who truly holds the title of the OG of real estate rappers?